Gene Notes

Some random and some not-so-random thoughts on family history.

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Kirtley & Bohannon

It's really nice to be able to find the marriage bond for your great-great-great-great grandparents, in this case Elijah Kirtley and Ann Bohannon. It would also be nice to actually see a marriage record.

Elijah and Ann were the parents of about 7 children. Their middle child was Sarah Ann Kirtley, who married Dr. John Stearns Percival. I had a clue delivered to me in the form of Sarah Ann Kirtley Percival Webb's (second husband was Lewis Webb) headstone, where it states she is the daughter of Elijah and Ann Kirtley.

The last piece, on the bottom, included with the marriage bond is the permission from Ann's father, Elliot Bohannon.

Copyright 2010-2018, ACK for Gene Notes

Monday, April 9, 2018

On the Hunt for H. G. Percival

My great-great-great grandfather, Dr. John Percival was married twice. I can document 4 of his children. I believe there were 6.

By his first wife, Matilda Fleet Hinton Goodridge, family says, he had a son Egbert D. Percival and a daughter Elizabeth. By his second wife, Sarah Ann Kirtley, he supposed had John Stearns Percival, Jr.; Jabez, Eliza and William. I have no documentation for Elizabeth or William.

Egbert married Fannie Banks in Rising Sun, Ohio county, Indiana in 1848. By 1850, they are living in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1851, Fannie gives birth to a child, who dies October 3, 1851. They migrated to Placer county, California in 1852 via Nicaragua and Acapulco, Mexico and San Francisco aboard the Independence.

In 1860 Egbert, Fannie and son, HENRY (very clearly written) aged 1 year. In 1870, Fannie is head of household, Henry (again very clearly written) is 11, Fannie's mother Sarah Banks is living with them and Egbert is enumerated last. The household was enumerated in September of 1870. The 1870 census asks for all people living in the house on June 1, 1870. Egbert died June 11, 1870.

In 1873, Fannie remarries, one C. W. Humphreys. In 1880 they are enumerated in Truckee, Nevada county, California. Also enumerated with them is H. G. Percival, aged 21, stepson to C. W. Humphreys and again, Fannie's mother, Sarah banks (step-mother.)

So, I've seen Henry Percival progress from Henry Percival to H. G. Percival. In 1900 and 1910 he appears as Harvey G. Percival.

There is a death record in the index for one Harvey Green Percival who resided in Nevada county, California, age 54, who died January 26, 1914. In most of the censuses, his father is listed as being born in Indiana, and his mother, too. There is some variation in 1900 and 1910 with his father being born in Kentucky and his mother in Indiana in 1900 and 1910 his father in Indiana and his mother in Tennessee. With my own great-great grandfather, John Stearns Percival, Jr., he is sometimes shown and being born in Kentucky and sometimes in Indiana. So that result is not unexpected.

I found this death notice over the weekend.


I would just love to know how he went from being Henry Percival to Harvey Percival. I'm pretty sure this is my guy. I have a feeling if I ever do view his death certificate, the parents' names won't be listed.

Copyright 2010-2018, ACK for Gene Notes

Thursday, March 15, 2018

23andMe Says What?

I was looking at my 23andMe results at lunch today.  I am pretty sure that <0.1% Native American was not there before. I would have noticed. However, there is one line I've never been able to document past my g-g-g grandfather, Nathaniel Davidson. So perhaps there could be some Native American.

So, I had to look at my Ancestry timeline. The one that is covered up is Scandinavian, but that wasn't the one I was interested in. My Nathaniel Davidson was born about 1797 (according to the 1850 census, the last census he appeared in.)


My mind conjures up all sorts of scenarios. I so wish I could connect with a descendant of Nathaniel. Or even one of his parents, but I think it's unlikely.


*There is also a segment that is 0.8% Broadly European. I presume that is like my dog's 50% they couldn't define what breed because it contained too many breeds?

Copyright 2010-2018, ACK for Gene Notes